Bum

I 1. имя существительное; используется в разговорной речи 1) используется в разговорной речи бездельник, лентяй, лодырь Синоним(ы): idler, loafer 2) американский вариант английского языка; употребляется в США; используется в разговорной речи бродяга, бездомный, бомж Например: to go on the bum — бродяжничать Синоним(ы): hobo, tramp 3) фанат Синоним(ы): devotee Например: to give somebody the bum's rush — вытолкать кого-либо взашей 2. имя прилагательное; используется в разговорной речи 1) плохой, дряной; ненужный, бесполезный Например: This is a bum party. — Это совершенно ужасная вечеринка. 2) халтурный, низкопробный 3. глагол; используется в разговорной речи 1) то же, что и bum about / around - лодырничать, шататься без дела; слоняться Например: I've been bumming about for the last year without a job. — Последний год я сидел без работы. 2) жить за чужой счёт - bum along II имя существительное; британский вариант английского языка; употребляется в Великобритании; используется в разговорной речи зад, задница Например: bums on seats — зрители, зрительская аудитория (рассматриваемые как источник дохода) to put / get more bums on seats — привлечь больше зрителей Синоним(ы): buttocks, backside, behind, bottom Например: builder's bum — частично обнажённые ягодицы (''выглядывающие'' из-под пояса брюк, когда человек нагибается)

Большой англо-русский словарь

Bum

- be on the bum

Англо-русский фразеологический словарь

Bum

I. noun Etymology: Middle English bom buttocks II. adjective Etymology: perhaps from 4bum 1. a. of poor quality or nature
Example: bum luck
Example: bum advice b. not valid or deserved
Example: a bum check
Example: a bum rap c. not pleasant or enjoyable
Example: a bum trip 2. affected or disabled by damage or injury
Example: a bum knee III. verb (bummed; bumming) Etymology: probably back-formation from 1bummer intransitive verb 1. loaf 2. to spend time unemployed and often wandering — often used with around transitive verb to obtain by asking or begging ; cadge
Example: bum a cigarette IV. noun Etymology: probably short for 1bummer 1. a. one who sponges off others and avoids work b. one who performs a function poorly
Example: called the umpire a bum c. one whose time is devoted to a recreational activity
Example: a beach bum
Example: ski bums 2. vagrant, tramp V. noun Etymology: perhaps from 3bum a drinking spree ; bender VI. transitive verb Etymology: probably back-formation from 2bummer disappoint, depress — often used with out
Example: the news really bummed me out

Энциклопедический словарь Мерриама-Вебстера

Bum

1. To make highly efficient, either in time or space, often at the expense of clarity. "I managed to bum three more instructions out of that code." "I spent half the night bumming the interrupt code." In elder days, John McCarthy (inventor of Lisp) used to compare some efficiency-obsessed hackers among his students to "ski bums"; thus, optimisation became "program bumming", and eventually just "bumming". 2. To squeeze out excess; to remove something in order to improve whatever it was removed from (without changing function; this distinguishes the process from a featurectomy). 3. A small change to an algorithm, program, or hardware device to make it more efficient. "This hardware bum makes the jump instruction faster." Usage: now uncommon, largely superseded by v. tune (and tweak, hack), though none of these exactly capture sense 2. All these uses are rare in Commonwealth hackish, because in the parent dialects of English "bum" is a rude synonym for "buttocks".

Онлайн словарь компьютерных терминов